nysfair.org

New York fair officials take action after Ohio accident

Following a ride malfunction that killed one person and injured several others at the Ohio State Fair this week, state officials want to assure fairgoers in New York that everything that’s possible is done to ensure that rides are safe.

Read More

Putting salt back into your diet

25 minutes ago

Americans eat too much salt. And that causes high blood pressure, heart attacks and strokes. Right? That’s been the message for the last several decades. But what if salt wasn’t really the culprit?

This week’s guest on “Take Care” believes cutting salt intake causes more harm than good. Dr. James DiNicolantonio is the author of "The Salt Fix: Why the Experts Got It All Wrong, and Why Eating More Might Save Your Life." DiNicolantonio is a leading cardiovascular research scientist and doctor of pharmacy at Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute.

Mercury in fish a possible risk factor for ALS

26 minutes ago
Mobilus In Mobili / Flickr

Many of us eat fish as part of a healthy diet. Full of healthy fat and nutrients, it’s a staple for people around the globe. But there’s another side of fish that’s less positive -- a possible link between mercury in fish and ALS.

Joining us this week on “Take Care” are two researchers of a recent study that found that eating certain types of fish may increase the risk of developing ALS.  The researchers are Dr. Elijah Stommel, a professor of Neurology at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College and a neurologist at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center; and Angeline Andrew, an assistant professor of neurology at the Geisel School in epidemiology and biostatistics and an experienced molecular epidemiologist.

Deputy White House counsel Gregory Katsas is the leading candidate for a judgeship in one of the most important federal appeals courts in the nation, NPR has learned.

While the White House has not yet named its pick for the seat on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, a Katsas nomination would open the door to confirmation hearings that could plumb a series of legal controversies from the first six months of the Trump administration.

Charlie Gard, the British baby with a terminal illness who became subject to a high-profile legal dispute, has died in hospice care, according to multiple media reports.

The Guardian, citing Gard's parents, reports that the infant died on Friday, one day after being transferred to an unidentified hospice facility.

Charlie had an rare genetic disorder known as MMDS, which affected his brain and his muscles. He could not move his limbs or breathe on his own.

Updated at 8:25 p.m. ET

North Korea said early Saturday that its intercontinental ballistic missile test on Friday showed its program could hit the United States, according to a statement reported by The Associated Press and Reuters.

The U.S. Department of Defense says the missile, which launched just before midnight local time, traveled roughly 620 miles — from the country's northern province of Jagang to the Sea of Japan, where it finally splashed into the waters off Japan's west coast.

Thomas Wheeler, who has been leading the Justice Department's civil rights unit, informed staffers there Thursday that he would be leaving the post, according to two sources familiar with the communication.

The U.S. economy grew at an annual rate of 2.6 percent between April and June.

It was nice comeback from the tepid 1.2 percent annual growth rate of the first quarter and more in line with the turbo-charged growth of 3 percent that has been promised by the Trump administration.

The latest growth was partially driven by an increase in consumer spending. It's a positive sign that Americans are opening up their wallets, especially since consumer spending makes up about 70 percent of the economy.

Fixing the salt issue

23 hours ago
Tamera Clark / Flickr

For decades, Americans have been told to eat less salt and that sodium contributes to high blood pressure and the risk of heart attack and stroke. But what if salt wasn't the culprit? This week on WRVO's health and wellness show “Take Care,” hosts Lorraine Rapp and Linda Lowen speak with Dr. James DiNicolantonio, the author of the new book, "The Salt Fix: Why the Experts Got It All Wrong." DiNicolantonio is a leading cardiovascular research scientist and doctor of pharmacy at Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute.  He says salt should not be demonized.

Updated 9:40 p.m. ET

Stung by new American sanctions, Russia's Foreign Ministry says the U.S. must downsize its diplomatic and technical staff in Moscow and other cities. The ministry is also suspending the U.S. Embassy's use of two sites — a storage facility and a dacha on an island in the Moscow River.

President Trump said Friday night he would sign the sanctions legislation because Congress was responsive to his input on the bill.

Pages